3 South and Banana does it again

Shapeshifting psychedelia to soundtrack your summer (once we´re allowed out again…) 3 South & Banana is the nom de guerre of Berlin-based Aurélien Bernard, a multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter and producer. New […]

Written By Noel Maurice

On April 8, 2020
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Shapeshifting psychedelia to soundtrack your summer (once we´re allowed out again…)

3 South & Banana is the nom de guerre of Berlin-based Aurélien Bernard, a multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter and producer. New single 3S&B precedes his eagerly awaited, eponymous album 3 South & Banana which arrives on 10th April courtesy of label Some Other Planet.

Reviewing this single has been an exercise in frustration for me, and I intend that as a compliment

Reviewing this single has been an exercise in frustration for me, and I intend that as a compliment, as I shall now explain. This song, and indeed, the entire album, is destined to soundtrack sunny days, road trips, camping excursions and the like. The sun is out (as I write this at least) and yet here we are in covid-19 quarantine and unable to charge to the beach as this song compels us to.

I mean, I know it´s barely even April, but such is the alluring force of this record, one is worryingly prepared to forget that fact and start digging out the swimwear.

Imagine, if you will, that psychedelic folk-hero Syd Barrett developed a jaunty french accent and travelled through time to usurp command of Tame Impala and you will have some idea of the magic 3 South & Banana brings to the table.

The single´s mesmeric video, featuring grainy, looping footage of tribal dancing, fits the music like a glove as the stamping, almost regimented percussion is juxtaposed against rubberised, tidal basslines and shimmering, gliding guitar parts. When Aurélien Bernard sings mantra-like “Let it be/smile at me/let it go/dying flow“, you can´t help but think of Syd Barrett and his child-like joyous expression in rhyming couplets. s

Stamping, almost regimented percussion is juxtaposed against rubberised, tidal basslines and shimmering, gliding guitar parts

The song goes on with an overarching lyrical theme of emotional enlightenment and of emancipation from cares and troubles. He sings of soaring into the stratosphere and of tuning into his own mind. “I was deaf“ he goes on “But now I hear/the atmosphere/inside my head“.

Such is the buoyant, shining energy of this music you may well find yourself joining the guy in taking a load off the ol‘ noodle, and as soon as the Corona lockdown is over, this single will be the theme tune to your sun drenched adventures.

Written by Chris Bently