Review: Idiot’s Dream by Freddie Dickson: intimate and disarming with a flare of Nick Cave

British Indie Singer-Songwriter Freddie Dickson Berlin inspired new EP Idiot’s Dream is out June 4th, 2021, via Shakey Records. The EP’s title track Idiot’s Dream starts out with ominous jangling electric guitar chords and an ethereal phantom falsetto before dropping into a solid indie rock drum beat, heavy on the bass end, that immediately pulls […]

Written By Brandon Miller

British Indie Singer-Songwriter Freddie Dickson Berlin inspired new EP Idiot’s Dream is out June 4th, 2021, via Shakey Records.

The EP’s title track Idiot’s Dream starts out with ominous jangling electric guitar chords and an ethereal phantom falsetto before dropping into a solid indie rock drum beat, heavy on the bass end, that immediately pulls you into the groove.

At first listen Freddie Dickson’s lyrics and singing style are reminiscent of something akin to Interpol but after some time you begin to feel a sensitive heartbeat beneath the dead-eyed breathy vocal. As the chorus phases in it feels that a slight crack of some romantic angelic light is coming through the clouds. Idiot’s Dream is a beautiful opening track for heading out the door into the night.

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A sensitive heartbeat beneath the dead-eyed breathy vocal

The second song on Idiot’s Dream EP is Sky Without Wings, a sultry soulful tune with a moon walking bass and layers of pulsing vibrato. Dickson’s vocal delivery is intimate and disarming with a flare of Nick Cave’s urgent style coming through in the hook along with the graceful touch of an effeminate background choir.

With the third track Night People we come out of the drama a bit and onto an up tempo kick snare beat that carries us along into slightly Silver Jews meets Belle and Sebastian pop tune that seems like it would be great to drive to. Here Dickson continues his unique storytelling whispery vocal but with a more delicate delivery above the trickle of piano keys, full clean electric guitar strums and the seraphim choir that sounds like they sat in from Leonard Cohen’s band.

Dickson’s vocal delivery is intimate and disarming with a flare of Nick Cave’s urgent style coming through

After this optimistic anthem of the people of the night we arrive at the last song Let The Good Things Last A Long Time. This gorgeous ender slips in under the door with a mystical otherworldly atmosphere that develops into a full on indie rock amble of Mazzy Star proportions.

Definitely keeping this lovely Idiot’s Dream lasting though the strange underworld of city night life.

The production quality of Idiot’s Dream is of high calibre coming through warm and rich on the headphones and perfect for a saunter through Berlin on a summer night. Freddie Dickson made the right choice moving to Berlin.

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Review by Brandon Miller